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#1

PolMoker

    PolMoker


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Geplaatst op 15 maart 2012 - 21:06

Wil iemand eens grondig bekijken en eventueel verbeteren wat ik nu al heb?(dit is nog niet mijn volledige tekst.)
Alvast bedankt.


Since tigers, lions, leopards (and every other species of cat) like to spend so much time grooming themselves, the volunteers of the ‘Big Cat Rescue’ decided to show them what they look like. The result was hilarious: by holding a mirror in front of their head, the vigorous animals were astonished and became stunned. Some of them even ran off because they became anxious by their reflection. Maybe they saw the other cat as a threat? Without doubt, it’s clear they are deceived by optical illusion and can’t make a difference between their image and reality. But do they possess other skills humans (don’t) have?

First of all, we’re going to deal with human behaviour that some animals display: language/communication, teaching/learning, dexterity and cunning.

Most animals can communicate with each other (and with humans). They aren’t able to produce the variety of sounds we can, as they don’t have the same vocal equipment. However, research has shown that animals can use body - and learn symbolic language, apes, for instance. On the other hand, specific species use other means: sounds, scents, colours, seismic trebling, etc. It’s remarkable animals can communicate with almost all senses.

As I previously mentioned, animals can learn abilities. For example: Peter Gabriel
(a famous artist who once sang ‘Shock the Monkey’) began working with the Atlantic Language Research Center and is now teaching a troupe of bonobo apes to play keyboards. The apes understand about 4,000 English words and recognize 400 pictograms, according to Gabriel. They also have a keen sense of rhythm and melody. Furthermore, they also are able to teach things to their own congeners. I’m not talking about the native instincts the parents need to activate in their offspring, but the learning process that requires no training at all. One ape that didn’t participated from the beginning of this project, learned to play the keys (and some songs) from his friends. Do humans underestimate the intelligence of primates?

In addition, lots of animals master fine motoric skills; dexterity (more and better than humans in my opinion). Most of you have already seen a squirrel hopping to a distant branch without missing a beat. While we are amazed, it’s just the ordinary life of a squirrel. The answer lies in the evolution theory of Darwin: most likely, the squirrel has a prehistoric ancestor. Therefore, this means it took millions of years to develop those skills. We must conclude we’re just underdeveloped at the moment, if we compare our progress to other species.



Second, exploring the subject ‘animal behavior (many) humans display’ could also be worth our while. Let’s look into mating procedures and perception.

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#2

esdoornblad

    esdoornblad


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Geplaatst op 18 maart 2012 - 03:21

Wil iemand eens grondig bekijken en eventueel verbeteren wat ik nu al heb?(dit is nog niet mijn volledige tekst.)


Hier zijn enkele kleine verbeteringen. [...]

Since tigers, lions, leopards (and every other species of cat) like to spend so much time grooming themselves, the volunteers of the ‘Big Cat Rescue’ decided to show them what they look like. The result was hilarious: by holding a mirror in front of their [heads], the vigorous animals were astonished and became stunned. Some of them even ran off because they became anxious [about] their reflection. Maybe they saw the other cat as a threat? Without doubt, it’s clear they are deceived by optical illusion and can’t [see] a difference between their image and reality. But do they possess other skills humans (don’t) have?

First of all, we’re going to deal with human behaviour that some animals display: language/communication, teaching/learning, dexterity and cunning.

Most animals can communicate with each other (and with humans). They aren’t able to produce the variety of sounds we can, as they don’t have the same vocal equipment. However, research has shown that animals can use body language] - and learn symbolic language [(apes, for instance)]. On the other hand, specific species use other means: sounds, scents, colours, seismic trebling, etc. It’s remarkable [how] animals can communicate with almost all senses.

As I previously mentioned, animals can learn abilities. For example: Peter Gabriel
(a famous artist who once sang ‘Shock the Monkey’) began working with the Atlantic Language Research Center and is now teaching a troupe of bonobo apes to play keyboards. The apes understand about 4,000 English words and recognize 400 pictograms, according to Gabriel. They also have a keen sense of rhythm and melody. Furthermore, they also are able to teach things to their own congeners. I’m not talking about the native instincts the parents need to activate in their offspring, but the learning process that requires no training at all. One ape that didn’t participated from the beginning of this project, learned to play the keys (and some songs) from his friends. Do humans underestimate the intelligence of primates?

In addition, lots of animals master fine [motor] skills; dexterity (more and better than humans[,] in my opinion). Most of you have already seen a squirrel [jumping] to a distant branch without missing a beat. While we are amazed, it’s just the ordinary life of a squirrel. The answer lies in [Darwin's] evolution theory: most likely, the squirrel has a prehistoric ancestor. Therefore, this means it took millions of years to develop those skills. We must conclude we’re just underdeveloped at the moment, if we compare our progress to other species.

Second, exploring the subject ‘animal behavior (many) humans display’ could also be worth our while. Let’s look into mating procedures and perception.





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